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ParentsCanada Guide to Private School - Fall 2017

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Dr. Maria Montessori's principles continue to guide Montessori education. Example of a lesson To teach about the Earth's hemispheres and the continents – and where the children themselves live – the coloured globe is used. It shows the continents in different colours. (The colours used for each continent are the same as in related materials for more advanced lessons later on; North America, for example, would always be orange.) The teacher would hold up the globe, explain that it is round, it is a sphere, it is a globe – and that it represents the planet we live on, Earth. The blue represents water, and the other colours represent land. The kids sing the 'continent song' with their teacher. Rotating the globe in her or his hands, the teacher explains that the children live in North America, that their classmate moved here from Europe, that another friend's family is from South America. In the next lesson, the teacher would use the globe alongside a hard, flat continent map to reinforce which continents are which. Lessons later progress to a puzzle map of countries, pin maps, etc., reinforcing past lessons and building on them. Lessons are often comprised of three parts: 'this is', 'show me' and 'what is this'. After a lesson is given, children are free to choose from purposeful activities. Good to know Because the word 'Montessori' is in the public domain, anyone can call theirs a Montessori school. That's why it's important for parents to do their research. One way to look into a school is to check whether it's recognized by bodies such as CCMA (Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators). Hillfield Strathallan College North Star Montessori h s c . o n . c a Learn more about the learning opportunities available at Hillfield Strathallan College by calling 905-389-1367 or visiting FIND JOY. EXPLORE POTENTIAL. LIVE WITH PURPOSE. Hillfield Strathallan College What does joy look like? It's the high five a Grade 6 rugby player receives from his Grade 8 teammate a er his first start. It's the Grade 11 math class examining parabolic arches by shooting basketballs in the gym. It's the smile on the face of a Montessori student who can see a seedling peeking through the dirt where she once planted a seed. Joy is found at Hillfield Strathallan College. From the moment a student walks onto the 50-acre campus in Hamilton, Ontario, the journey begins. Starting as early as 18-months in the Junior and Montessori Schools, students drive their desire to learn through inquiry and imagination. HSC Middle School students in Grades 5 through 8 discover who they are, and what their interests are, in a positive and supportive environment. In the Senior School, students in Grades 9 through 12 expand their horizons and take ownership of the educational pathways leading them into their futures. The graduate who emerges from HSC is inspired with the skills needed to live, and lead, with purpose. Learn more at hsc.on.ca

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